For want of wonder

Milky Way against dark sky with silhouettes of trees in foreground

“The world will never starve for want of wonders; but only for want of wonder.” ~G.K. Chesterton

Small children have no problem with wonder. They find wonder in everything they see. But as adults we often lose our capacity for wonder, getting bogged down in the details and responsibilities of daily life.

The wonders of the world don’t go away. We just become oblivious to them, though they surround us at every moment.

If you’re looking for more joy in your days, reconnect to your childhood sense of wonder, and you’ll discover that there’s no lack of wonders all around you!

What can you sit with?

Young child and teddy bear sitting together

“Instead of asking ourselves, “How can I find security and happiness?” we could ask ourselves, “Can I touch the center of my pain? Can I sit with suffering, both yours and mine, without trying to make it go away? Can I stay present to the ache of loss or disgrace—disappointment in all its many forms—and let it open me?” This is the trick.” ~Pema Chödrön

How well are you able to sit with your own suffering? What about the suffering of others? The only way to heal our pain is by going through it, and that means being able to sit with it, open to it, and touch its very center. We need to be able to do that for ourselves and accompany others as they do the same, without rushing to make it all go away. This may be the hardest challenge most of us will ever face.

Gratitude bestows reverence

sunset over large body of water with palm tree branches in foreground

“Gratitude bestows reverence, allowing us to encounter everyday epiphanies, those transcendent moments of awe that change forever how we experience life and the world.” ~John Milton

The intentional practice of gratitude changes us. And there are always moments and people and things to be grateful for, even in life’s hardest times.

How often do you focus on gratitude in your days?